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Asphalt Patching in Plum

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"We love the looks of it…haven’t driven on it yet.  We hate to get it dirty😆.

All the workers were so pleasant and friendly.  Everyone was so respectful of our property and our neighbors’.  They did a great clean up job also. Very good experience.  I did videos because my son and grandson are diesel mechanics and anything involving big equipment interests them.  

Thank you for the excellent work and your promptness in keeping in touch with us throughout the whole process."


— Nancy and Lawrence Malone

"We were so pleased with the wonderful workmanship of the whole crew-- and had a fun time remembering with the 'foreman' that when the crew was here in 2011 to do the initial paving of our driveway, that was the day there was an earthquake in Virginia that was felt out here! 😉

THANKS so much for helping coordinate things!! The new sections for 'pull-off parking' are just wonderful!"


— Susan Richman
AP Coordinator / AP US History Instructor

"The job they did for me went very well.
Very p
rofessional service, very well done. Everything went smooth. I will be contacting them next year!"


— David R.

"I had a patio done. They did really great work. Thank you."


— Kathy M.

"On time, on budget, and did a great job.

I never even saw them!"


— J Rudov

"Best driveway work by JR. They are trusted and very meticulous with their work.

Best recommendation."


— Dawn H.

"I am very pleased with my driveway beautiful work the workers were very professional and listened to all my concerns I highly recommend your company."


— Tinapihiou

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Residential & Comercial paving company serving the Western Pennsylvania and the Tri-State Area

JR Paving & Construction Co Inc is a full-service paving company that takes pride in providing quality services to our customers. Our experienced paving contractors handle each job as if it's their only job. With more than 50 years of paving experience, we can handle a wide range of services for both residential and commercial customers.

Whether you are in need of new paving, or maintenance and repair, you have come to the right place. We provide asphalt and paving services throughout Western Pennsylvania and the surrounding Tri-State Area. If you are looking for asphalt paving construction and repair services you can count on, give us a call today.

Asphalt Patching Services in Plum

Professional paving installation and maintenance will keep your pavement looking great. As a fully insured and licensed paving company serving Western Pennsylvania and Tri-State Area, JR Paving & Construction Co., Inc. provides quality paving services for your commercial or residential property. We handle all aspects of paving construction, including parking lotsdriveways, and roads. With more than 50 years of paving experience, the work that we do is of a high quality so you don't have to worry about getting it re-paved anytime soon!

One of the most common ways of repairing asphalt pavements is to use asphalt patching. It’s a quick and easy method of repairing any asphalt surface, particularly if it’s been damaged by vandals. However, as with all repair work, asphalt patching can leave behind potentially compromising marks that can be hard to remove. That’s why it’s especially important to apply the right type of material, and to use the right tools, to ensure the greatest success.

Before you can patch your asphalt, it must be thoroughly cleaned. This means getting out all the grit and grime that can be seen on the surface. If possible, you should choose a high-pressure water jetting system to wash the asphalt down. If you’re not in a position to do this yourself, call in a reputable company. They’ll likely require a large area of land to work on, so make sure yours is big enough. The cost of this service will depend on the size of the repair job and the frequency of use.

Once your asphalt has been washed down, then you can begin patching. The first tool you will need when doing this is a sharp blade. You should use something that will cut through the asphalt without too much difficulty. Asphalt patching can be quite messy, so you want to make sure you are wearing suitable footwear when working on the asphalt. The safest choice might be to wear work boots.

Another tool you will want to have handy is a paint sprayer. This is especially handy if you don’t want to damage or crack in the asphalt that you are patching. A paint sprayer is also useful in making sure you use the right material. If you have a piece of metal fencing that is exposed to the elements, you can use the sprayer to apply the paint.

After you have everything you need, you will want to start your job. One way to make sure the asphalt patch you are applying is the correct shape is to lay it out on the ground and look at it from different angles. You can also use a spirit level to ensure the height and distance between the asphalt patch and the surrounding area is correct. When you are happy with the height and distance, apply the asphalt. When the asphalt is dry, you can begin working on the next section of asphalt.

There are many ways that you can complete these tasks, but the most commonly used method involves using heavy-duty sponges that are driven onto the asphalt. The sponges will then roll off to the side as the area of the asphalt to be patched is being patched. Make sure you wear suitable safety equipment when doing this.

Once the material has been patched, you will need to cover up the area that was not patched. One way to do this is to use pavement paint. Pavement paint can provide a durable, long-lasting covering for small areas of sidewalk or driveway. If you have a lot of extra space, you can use a large sheet of asphalt that is left unadorned. Just make sure to use caution in order not to damage your sidewalks and driveways.

Asphalt patching can be a big job. It can also be a messy process, especially if there are several layers to patch. If you are going to hire someone to patch your driveway, it is important that they know how to properly patch an asphalt surface. This can make the job go much more smoothly.

Before hiring a contractor to do asphalt patching for you, make sure he or she has the proper equipment. Some of the most important tools he or she will need to include: a spade, steel wool and an angle grinder. A spade will be used to dig up the affected area, followed by steel wool to remove the ground material. After the material has been removed, the spade is used to pave the newly patched area. A grinder is used to smooth out the rough edges between the different layers of asphalt. Most importantly, the crew will need an angle grinder to ensure a neat, even finish.

Before hiring someone to do asphalt patching for you, make sure he or she is licensed and that he or she uses the proper materials and techniques. Ask for before and after photos of previous jobs that he or she has done. You can even ask for references so you can check out the work history of the contractor. You can also ask neighbors and friends and family members who have had the same job done before.

There are many things to consider when hiring contractors for asphalt patching. First and foremost, make sure you get the right person. Don’t choose your friend just because he or she is nearby or has good references. Also, you want someone who will be honest and punctual so there will be no problem if something gets done on time. Finally, choose a contractor who offers a reasonable price for quality work.

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With more than 50 years in business, we know a thing or two about customer service. We are dedicated to providing our customers with quality paving services that can't be beaten. You can trust in our service and experience to complete your job, no matter how big or small.

We provide paving services throughout the surrounding Western Pennsylvania and Tri-State Area.

Why would you not want to seek paving services from one of the top paving companies in Western Pennsylvania and Tri-State Area? Call JR Paving and Construction Co., Inc. today at (888) 497-3391 for a FREE estimate for your paving needs.

Asphalt Patching in Plum, PA

About Plum, PA

A plum is a fruit of some species in Prunus subg. Prunus. Dried plums are most often called prunes, though after the year 2000 in the United States they may be just labeled as 'dried plums'.

Plums may have been one of the first fruits domesticated by humans, with origins in East European and Caucasian mountains and China. They were brought to Britain from Asia, and their cultivation has been documented in Andalusia, southern Spain. Plums are a diverse group of species, with trees reaching a height of 5-6 meters when pruned. The fruit is a drupe, with a firm and juicy flesh.

China is the largest producer of plums, followed by Romania and Serbia. Japanese or Chinese plums dominate the fresh fruit market, while European plums are also common in some regions. Plums can be eaten fresh, used in jams, or fermented into wine or brandy. Plum kernels contain cyanogenic glycosides, but the oil made from them is not commercially available.

In terms of nutrition, raw plums are 87% water, 11% carbohydrates, 1% protein, and less than 1% fat. They are a moderate source of vitamin C but do not contain significant amounts of other micronutrients.

Plums may have been one of the first fruits domesticated by humans. Three of the most abundantly cultivated species are not found in the wild, only around human settlements: Prunus domestica has been traced to East European and Caucasian mountains, while Prunus salicina and Prunus simonii originated in China. Plum remains have been found in Neolithic age archaeological sites along with olives, grapes and figs. According to Ken Albala, plums originated in Iran. They were brought to Britain from Asia.

An article on plum tree cultivation in Andalusia (southern Spain) appears in Ibn al-'Awwam's 12th-century agricultural work, Book on Agriculture.

The name plum derived from Old English plume "plum, plum tree", borrowed from Germanic or Middle Dutch, derived from Latin prūnum and ultimately from Ancient Greek προῦμνον proumnon, itself believed to be a loanword from an unknown language of Asia Minor. In the late 18th century, the word plum was used to indicate "something desirable", probably in reference to tasty fruit pieces in desserts.

Plums are a diverse group of species. The commercially important plum trees are medium-sized, usually pruned to 5–6 metres (16–20 ft) height. The tree is of medium hardiness. Without pruning, the trees can reach 12 metres (39 ft) in height and spread across 10 metres (33 ft). They blossom in different months in different parts of the world; for example, in about January in Taiwan and early April in the United Kingdom.

Fruits are usually of medium size, between 2–7 centimetres (0.79–2.76 in) in diameter, globose to oval. The flesh is firm and juicy. The fruit's peel is smooth, with a natural waxy surface that adheres to the flesh. The plum is a drupe, meaning its fleshy fruit surrounds a single hard fruitstone which encloses the fruit's seed.

Japanese or Chinese plums are large and juicy with a long shelf life and therefore dominate the fresh fruit market. They are usually clingstone and not suitable for making prunes. They are cultivars of Prunus salicina or its hybrids. The cultivars developed in the US are mostly hybrids of P. salicina with P. simonii and P. cerasifera. Although these cultivars are often called Japanese plums, two of the three parents (P. salicina and P. simonii) originated from China and one (P. cerasifera) from Eurasia.

In some parts of Europe, European plum (Prunus domestica) is also common in fresh fruit market. It has both dessert (eating) or culinary (cooking) cultivars, which include:

In West Asia, myrobalan plum or cherry plum (Prunus cerasifera) is also widely cultivated. In Russia, apart from these three commonly cultivated species, there are also many cultivars resulting from hybridization between Japanese plum and myrobalan plum, known as Russian plum (Prunus × rossica).

When it flowers in the early spring, a plum tree will be covered in blossoms, and in a good year approximately 50% of the flowers will be pollinated and become plums. Flowering starts after 80 growing degree days.

If the weather is too dry, the plums will not develop past a certain stage, but will fall from the tree while still tiny, green buds, and if it is unseasonably wet or if the plums are not harvested as soon as they are ripe, the fruit may develop a fungal condition called brown rot. Brown rot is not toxic, and some affected areas can be cut out of the fruit, but unless the rot is caught immediately, the fruit will no longer be edible. Plum is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera, including November moth, willow beauty and short-cloaked moth.

The taste of the plum fruit ranges from sweet to tart; the skin itself may be particularly tart. It is juicy and can be eaten fresh or used in jam-making or other recipes. Plum juice can be fermented into plum wine. In central England, a cider-like alcoholic beverage known as plum jerkum is made from plums. Dried, salted plums are used as a snack, sometimes known as saladito or salao. Various flavors of dried plum are available at Chinese grocers and specialty stores worldwide. They tend to be much drier than the standard prune. Cream, ginseng, spicy, and salty are among the common varieties. Licorice is generally used to intensify the flavor of these plums and is used to make salty plum drinks and toppings for shaved ice or baobing. Pickled plums are another type of preserve available in Asia and international specialty stores. The Japanese variety, called umeboshi, is often used for rice balls, called onigiri or omusubi. The ume, from which umeboshi are made, is more closely related, however, to the apricot than to the plum.

In the Balkans, plum is converted into an alcoholic drink named slivovitz (plum brandy, called in Bosnian, Croatian, Montenegrin or Serbian šljivovica). A large number of plums, of the Damson variety, are also grown in Hungary, where they are called szilva and are used to make lekvar (a plum paste jam), palinka (traditional fruit brandy), plum dumplings, and other foods. In Romania, 80% of the plum production is used to create a similar brandy, called țuică.

As with many other members of the rose family, plum kernels contain cyanogenic glycosides, including amygdalin. Prune kernel oil is made from the fleshy inner part of the pit of the plum. Though not available commercially, the wood of plum trees is used by hobbyists and other private woodworkers for musical instruments, knife handles, inlays, and similar small projects.

In 2019, global production of plums (data combined with sloes) was 12.6 million tonnes, led by China with 56% of the world total (table). Romania and Serbia were secondary producers.

Raw plums are 87% water, 11% carbohydrates, 1% protein, and less than 1% fat (table). In a 100-gram (3+12-ounce) reference serving, raw plums supply 192 kilojoules (46 kilocalories) of food energy and are a moderate source only of vitamin C (12% Daily Value), with no other micronutrients in significant content (table).

The numerous species of Prunus subg. Prunus are classified into many sections, but not all of them are called plums. Plums include species of sect. Prunus and sect. Prunocerasus, as well as P. mume of sect. Armeniaca. Only two plum species, the hexaploid European plum (Prunus domestica) and the diploid Japanese plum (Prunus salicina and hybrids), are of worldwide commercial significance. The origin of P. domestica is uncertain but may have involved P. cerasifera and possibly P. spinosa as ancestors. Other species of plum variously originated in Europe, Asia and America.

Sect. Prunus (Old World plums) – leaves in bud rolled inwards; flowers 1–3 together; fruit smooth, often wax-bloomed

Sect. Prunocerasus (New World plums) – leaves in bud folded inwards; flowers 3–5 together; fruit smooth, often wax-bloomed

Sect. Armeniaca (apricots) – leaves in bud rolled inwards; flowers very short-stalked; fruit velvety; treated as a distinct subgenus by some authors

In certain parts of the world, some fruits are called plums and are quite different from fruits known as plums in Europe or the Americas. For example, marian plums are popular in Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia, otherwise also known as gandaria, plum mango, ma-praang, ma-yong, ramania, kundang, rembunia or setar. Another example is the loquat, also known as Japanese plum and Japanese medlar, as well as nispero, bibassier and wollmispel elsewhere. In South Asia and Southeast Asia, Jambul, a fruit from tropical tree in family Myrtaceae, is similarly sometimes referred to 'damson plums', and it is different from damson plums found in Europe and Americas. Jambul is also called as Java plum, Malabar plum, Jaman, Jamun, Jamblang, Jiwat, Salam, Duhat, Koeli, Jambuláo or Koriang.

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